A candid look at WDTN: Reporters

January 24th, 2011 at 11:08 am by under News, Technology News

Chief Videographer Kris Sproles is at it again taking candid photos of the employees at WDTN.  This week Kris is showcasing the reporters in their work environment.

Sonu Wasu: Reporter

Sonu is in the audio booth recording her voice track for her news story.  Her last day is

Wednesday January 26th.

Jim Bucher: Bucher’s Beat Reporter

Jim is in the edit area looking for some old file footage.  He’s probably looking for video

he shot back in 1983!

Megan O’Rourke: News Reporter

Megan is getting ready for her newsroom live shot.

Holly Samuels: Reporter/Weekend Anchor

Holly is at her desk setting up her news story.

Anthony Kiekow: Reporter

Anthony is writing his story in the newsroom.

Jordan Burgess: Reporter

Jordan is making his daily beat calls. I love the old 2 news mic flags near his desk.

So who do you want to see next? let me know.

4 Responses to “A candid look at WDTN: Reporters”

  1. Leslie Short says:

    thanks for sharing. i’ve always wanted to know how they do what they do. thanks again

  2. Bill Telzerow says:

    Great job in candid photography… Wonderful choice in B&W…

  3. Ric Moody says:

    Where is Sonu Wasu going after the 26th?

    Always like watching her reports.

    Thanks,

    Ric Moody

  4. Larry Maloney says:

    “March Madness” coverage!!!

    The real “madness” is the untimely televised public display of how our community “financially benefits” from our visiting guests during March Madness. Visitors tune in local television or radio and immediately learn their value is four million dollars to our economy and “locals” are publically encouraged be nice to them so they keep spending dollars.

    Wouldn’t it be better if we were nice to them because we are nice people and want to welcome them? Television stations don’t need to tell the citizenry how to be civil to company. I‘m sure the NCAA officials in town and the teams themselves aren’t overwhelmed with a feeling of love knowing they are just dollar signs. One television station even put two visiting cheerleaders on air and on the spot soliciting them to tell us how great Dayton is and how much they like visiting us… “yes, we were surprise there are so many things to do in this little town”.

    One Oregon District restaurateur was salivating over the prospects of the visitors eating as much today as they did yesterday. Why is that “news”, especially while our guests are in town. When the Mayor get visitors from out of State does he say in earshot, “our revenue from parking is up thanks to the fat cats? Well, our local televised news is equally as tacky.

    One UD student selected to sit with the President during the game stated if given the opportunity he’d hit the President up for “help” for our community. Seriously, can’t the President watch the game without being confronted politically by his student guest?

    Do you suppose other community leaders will try harder to get the “First Four” next time since we classify and publicize the event as a really good money maker?

    Why offend visitors and motivate competition and put a monetary value on the activity? At least wait until they all go home. Then publicize the economic impact of their visit if it’s “news”.

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